SAVING History

Submitted by lmcshane on Thu, 03/03/2011 - 20:56.


Today, you see the UGLY right out there for what it is--the real estate game in NEO--LAND cleared and history demolished at tax-payer expense for GREED.

And, you can SEE for yourself--another example of the massive FRAUD perpetrated in the NEO non-profit sector.

In Europe, it's a different story.  Folks understand that to move forward, you must understand the past.  Not so, in America, and especially in NEO.  Everything boils down to the almightly dollar.

BOW down and worship the almighty dollar in NEO--as we clear land and history for developers at no charge to them--so they can make a quick buck parking a car.

 

 

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I realized historic preservation is a joke here years ago

I realized historic preservation is a joke here years ago - nobody here cares at all - I stopped caring about it here myself... old Cleveland is not worth preserving - nothing - I'm only interested in stopping the killing from the pollution and toxicity here - bulldoze away

Disrupt IT

Norm and lmcshane....

Hopefully they will clean the soil too...before, building their new town out of my town of 55 years!

I don't think they are bothering to clean

I don't think they are bothering to clean anything - just driving the people away and mothballing the property, near as I can tell

Disrupt IT

Master Plan 2020 Playland...

come on...it really will be like "Heaven on Earth"...They are going to make new history.  I think I am getting "brain-washed" today...Oh please, please somebody SAVE ME!

At least areas are becoming livable

At least areas are becoming livable. I live in an historic house and neighborhood but it was too polluted to be safe, so nobody lived here and all the history went to hell and is being demolished. Now we are getting rid of the pollution source that made the neighborhood unlivable so people can live here again - and I guarantee people will follow and fix up what is left behind - and there will be money pumped into the empty areas for new developments - so if a neighborhood is made livable then people will live there and if not then people will not - and it really doesn't matter what history is there either way, if it is not a safe environment.

Disrupt IT

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RIP on the Columbia Building...too...

  See:

http://www.clevelandareahistory.com/2011/05/threatened-columbia-building.html

 

From the Michelle Jarboe article in the Plain Dealer

:

Since November, entities linked to Frangos have purchased the Columbia Building, a Cleveland landmark and the former home of Myers University at 112 Prospect Ave.; a former bookstore building at Ontario and Prospect; and two parking lots owned by members of the Maloof family.

It seems apparent that Frangos will build a multilevel parking garage on the site, said Matt Howells, who owns the historic Park Building nearby and who has toured the Stanley Block building and believes it can be rehabilitated. "It all adds up, when you look at the best return for that area."

 

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Fate of downtown block uncertain

Companies tied to parking-lot magnate Lou Frangos own most of a block across from the first phase of a planned $350 million casino project. Now a Frangos company has acquired an interest in the owner of the Stanley Block, one of downtown's oldest buildings, and is pushing for demolition. The blue blocks on the map show the properties on the block; click on each for details. The red dot locates the site of the proposed phase one casino.

 

And, Jennifer Coleman feigns tortured indecision...this is all so familiar...


 

This is CLE+

 

Entities tied to Frangos paid more than $9 million for the properties near the casino site. Yet his many companies are plagued with financial troubles, including more than $450,000 in overdue property taxes in Cuyahoga County and defaults on two county loans, totaling more than $1.5 million.

Frangos has declined to comment about the Stanley Block. In a letter sent last month to the Landmarks Commission, he argued that "this problem building should be razed immediately." He did not appear at the commission's meeting Thursday.

expatclevguy March 04, 2011 at 10:26AM

 

My vacation in Cleveland: First I visited the glamorous casino, then I had a little picnic lunch right outside the casino (between a new Chevy Cobalt & a Dodge Voyager - Totally awesome!).

After that I went to Public Square to enjoy the view of so much unique Cleveland-style parking. Amazing - it was totally everywhere - So cool! I was able to see parking lots from the casino lots all the way across Public Square to West 3rd Street.

Then I parked my car here and there. Then I sat in my car for a while and listened to the radio as I watched other people park their cars. Then I drove away 'cause there was nothing else to see, except more parking lots. But it was kind'a nice, I guess.

From reporter Michelle Jarboe:

Hi dhazard -

Thanks for commenting. The building was constructed in the 1870s and has been home to a variety of retailers and other tenants. The ballroom was a meeting place for labor unions and was used for social debuts of young women. Samuel Gompers, the founder of the American Federation of Labor, spoke there in 1891.

The Richman Brothers store used to be on the corner of Ontario and Prospect, where the former Daughters of St. Paul Bookstore building, home to the Stafford & Stafford law firm, is located. In the early 1900s, portions of the Stanley Block building were used as a Richman Brothers annex.

The Stanley Block also housed an F.W. Woolworth dime store, followed by other retailers. You can still see the Barbara Anne Bridal Shoppe sign on the outside of the building.

Christopher Busta-Peck, over at the Cleveland Area History blog, wrote a very detailed entry about the Stanley Block last year: http://www.clevelandareahistory.com/2010/06/condemned-stanley-block.html

Michelle

From reporter Michelle Jarboe:

Hi banneduser -

I interviewed the head of the Cleveland Restoration Society for this article -- I just didn't have space to include a comment from her. They have been watching the Stanley Block building for a long time and support efforts to rehabilitate and preserve it.

The group wrote to the Cleveland Landmarks Commission and sent a representative to the hearing Thursday to express support for making the building a city landmark. They called the Stanley Block "one of the most significant buildings downtown."

Representatives of the Ohio Canal Corridor, the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects and Main Street Medina were among half a dozen people who sent letter of support to the Landmarks Commission.

The commission received letters of opposition from Lou Frangos and David Hales, an attorney representing one of Frangos' companies.

Michelle

 

 

 

Aye...yes...bookstore....a religious bookstore...

that, is where I used to go buy my religious material to pray for all the people in this city...good and evil.

Frangos and Stanley Block