WHO KILLED COCK ROBIN

Submitted by Martha Eakin on Mon, 04/16/2007 - 21:38.

This is the title of a children’s book that spent some time in our house.  I believe the afflicted robin of the title died of pesticide poisoning.  I thought of him the other night when my friend Susan mentioned she had seen three dead robins in the past week.  That comment made me recall that I had watched a robin feebly hopping in a busy intersection and not at all removing himself from danger.  As we stood on the corner, in the snow, another person waiting to cross Lee entered our conversation; she too had seen dead robins – two – recently.  Now perhaps we all saw the same three robins….but  it is still weird, something is up.  Sleuth Susan went home and discovered that many robins have been stretched to the breaking point by the recent high/low extreme weather we’ve been having. Read more

Beautiful drawing... we're feeding our birds and animals

Evelyn and I were talking about how bad the weather changes are for the birds, other animals, insects and plants. We've been putting out lots of bird seed and other food for the birds and squirrels. Have you seen the crazy mix of birds by the warm water outlet at the powerplant on the shoreway, and all the dead birds in the road. It looks like more than Robins are out of sorts right now... saw a skunk in our Ohio City back yard last night.... hawk in Rockefeller Park Sunday... for related insight, I recommend reading "Global Warming Increases Species Extinctions Worldwide"

Disrupt IT

I will put out a bird bath tomorrow!

I listened to an interview with an ornithologist on NPR a few days ago and she made me realize the dire consequences the recent snow and cold weather is having on the birds. Deprived of their food sources (insects, fruit and seeds) due to the snow, we can expect many birds to die. I few years ago I spoke to somone who is involved in rehabilitating injured birds of prey. I realized then the cruel realities of nature. She told me that most hawks die in their first year because they fail to become good hunters. For bird of prey missing a meal can be a matter of life or death. Hunting takes a lot of energy, energy they cannot afford to waste on an unsuccessful hunt. They become weak quickly if they do not eat and soon die. With all the man made obstacles birds face -- pesticides, destruction of their habitat, collisions with motor vehicles, etc.  birds need our help to survive. Thank you for reminding me that providing for the birds a responsibility not a hobby.

this moring in the redbud tree

This morning as I was reading Martha's post about the robins, I looked up and saw a robin looking in the window. The bird looked healthy (but what do I know) and was in the branches of the Red Bud tree outside my breakfast room window. I took a walk around the yard this morning with the dog (a squirrel patrol) and noticed that the lilac though many of its new leaves are blackened by the recent freeze has new bright green leaves, too. The European Ginger is sprouting magnificently and Solomon's Seal, Mayflower and Violets are launching. So much for the Daffodils and Hyacinths -- they were blooming when the snow hit. The Hydrangea has green shoots, the Peony is unfurling, and I can see green leaves sprouting from the Clematis. Even our Apple, Dogwood and Red Bud trees are showing buds. Thank God! I have been whining inwardly even as I repress my outward disappointment about the weather. I am from North Florida and at this time, we would have azaleas -- huge hedges of them blooming fuchsia and white everywhere. Here's a display.